Transposition of the Great Arteries Birth Defects

Transposition of the Great Arteries Birth Defects

The leading law firm of Alonso Krangle LLP is investigating potential lawsuits on behalf of families whose child may have been born with transposition of the great arteries because of their mother’s use of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant during pregnancy. A growing body of research has linked the use of SSRI antidepressants to birth defects, including transposition of the great arteries.

SSRIs that may be associated with the occurrence of transposition of the great arteries include:

  • Celexa
  • Lexapro
  • Paxil
  • Prozac
  • Zoloft

The birth defect lawyers at Alonso Krangle LLP are leaders in defective drug litigation, and understand how devastating having a child with transposition of the great arteries can be. If your child’s suffering was caused by an SSRI antidepressant taken during pregnancy, filing a SSRI transposition of the great arteries lawsuit could enable you to obtain money damages for your child’s current and future medical needs, pain and suffering, and emotional distress. The birth defect lawyers at Alonso Krangle LLP are currently offering free lawsuit consultations in all 50 states to any family who believes an SSRI caused their baby to suffer from transposition of the great arteries. To learn more about obtaining justice for your baby, please contact the SSRI birth defect lawyers at Alonso Krangle LLP today.

What is Transposition of the Great Arteries?

Transposition of the great arteries occurs when the two major arteries carrying blood away from the heart – the Aorta and the Pulmonary Artery – are “transposed” from their normal position so that the aorta arises from the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery from the left ventricle.

In normal hearts, blood that returns from the body goes through the right side of the heart and pulmonary artery to the lungs to get oxygen. The blood then comes back to the left side of the heart and travels out the aorta to the body. In transposition of the great arteries, the blood goes to the lungs, picks up oxygen, returns to the heart, and then flows right back to the lungs without ever going to the body. Blood from the body returns to the heart and goes back to the body without ever picking up oxygen in the lungs.

Symptoms of transposition of the great arteries appear at or shortly after birth, and will depend on how much oxygen moves through the body’s general blood flow.

Some common symptoms of this condition include:

  • Blueness of the skin
  • Clubbing of the fingers or toes
  • Poor feeding
  • Shortness of breath

To establish safe oxygen levels and stable cardiac and pulmonary function, a newborn with transposition of the great arteries will be administered a continuous infusion of prostaglandin, a medication that will keep the ductus arteriosus open. A procedure using a long, thin flexible tube (balloon atrial septostomy) may be needed to create a large hole in the atrial septum to allow blood to mix. A surgery called an arterial switch procedure is used to permanently correct the problem within the baby’s first week of life.

Learn more About Filing an SSRI Transposition of the Great Arteries Lawsuit

If your child was born with transposition of the great arteries, and you believe an SSRI, including Celexa, Lexapro, Paxil, Prozac, or Zoloft, might be to blame, you may be eligible to file a lawsuit against the manufacturers of these medications. To learn more about the legal options available to you, please contact the SSRI birth defect lawyers at Alonso Krangle LLP by filling out our online form or calling 1-800-403-6191.